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ARC Home > Projects > Faith in food :
News and newsletters | ARC holds agricultural workshop in Kenya | Quakers grow a sustainable community | Prince Charles plants a mango tree in Tanzania | Catholics urged to give up meat on Fridays For Lent | ARC holds fourth Faith in Food workshop in London | ARC wins Fairtrade thumbs up | ARC and Tree Aid workshop in Ghana | People of faith urged to avoid 'cruelty' eggs | Mumbai onion scandal hits India's poor

ARC holds fourth Faith in Food workshop in London

The fourth Faith in Food workshop organised by ARC brought together more than 60 delegates from Christian, Hindu, Jain, Jewish and Muslim faith groups and secular organisations in London in April 2011 to debate the issue of how to achieve a more faith-consistent and sustainable food and farming system. One of the speakers, Soil Association director Helen Browning, said the environmental challenge also included the fall in biodiversity – “one of the great unrecognised real issues of our times”. To read the full story click here .


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Related information

How does ARC work with the faiths?
We list some of the far-reaching ways that faiths can affect their environment
Green pilgrimage network (GPN)
The vision is of pilgrims on all continents and the pilgrim cities that receive them, leaving a positive footprint on the Earth
March 30, 2011:
Inspiring stories of faith eco action from Africa
In Nigeria, children attending schools run by the Qadiriyyah Sufi Movement receive half their marks upon graduation from how well they have looked after tree seedlings. In Tanzania, young people must first plant 10 trees before they can be confirmed.