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ARC Home > Faiths and Ecology > Buddhism > Buddhist links :

Buddhist ecology in practice

Mongolian calendar created as part of a World Bank/ARC collaboration, including days on which hunting is traditionally banned.

Organisations

The Buddhist Peace Fellowship has news about EcoJustice.

The International Network of Engaged Buddhists, founded in 1989 in Thailand by Sulak Sivarska, pioneers social and educational programmes with a strong ecological dimension.

Earth Sangha is devoted to Buddhism and the environment, with actions including establishing wild p;ant nurseries and an arboretum in Washington DC and support for a mass tree-planting programme in Dominican Republic.

Ecological Buddhism has a blog, and a particular interest in scientific data and technological solutions to climate change.

Buddhist Academy for Ecological Awakening is based in Seoul, South Korea, and offers a range of courses and training programmes "on the basis of Buddhistical fundamental lessons centering on the thoughts of life respect for the purpose of the unification of nature and human being" with the goal of establishing new environmental ethics.

Mountain Mind Foundation is a California based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization working to promote environmental and cultural stewardship throughout the Himalayas.

The Ecobuddhism website includes two short videos:

Thrangu Rinpoche 1

THrangu Rinpoche 2

of Thrangu Rinpoche and his answer to the question of what the Buddhist sangha should do in response to climate change. Acknowledging that Guru Rinpoche's prediction of a time when the "snowy mountains wear black hats" was probably a prediction of a time of climate change, he suggested that Buddhists take two steps. First they inform themselves about how things are, so they can understand what steps to take. And second, they make aspiration prayers to the three precious jewels. "Is that going to directly stop global warming?" he asks, rhetorically. "No. But it will gradually help to transform our minds, and then we will make efforts to help the situation. So it is not by any means a pointless thing to do."

Books and publications

108 Things You Can Do To Help Save The Environment - paper compiled during the first conference on environmental protection for Kagyu Buddhist Monasteries and Centres, March 2009

Environmental Guidelines for Karma Kagyu Monasteries, Centers and Community - useful handbook outlining the principles and practice of environmental conservation within the Karma Kagyu Buddhist tradition commissioned by the Seventeenth Karmapa, Ogyen Drodul Trinley Dorje in 2008.

Eco-Guide for Leh City by the Ladakh Ecological Development Group is a model Green Pilgrimage guide addressing how green hotels are and can be.

Green Dharma about Buddhism and the environment. This book is available as a pfd download

Paper on the environmental challenges and opportunities facing contemporary Buddhism for the 3rd World Buddhist Forum in Hong Kong.


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Related information

What others have said about religion, the environment - and ARC
Comments about ARC's work with faith groups with the vision of caring and protecting our world, and about the need to link conservation with faith.
What does Buddhism teach about ecology?
A brief outline of the teachings of ecology in Buddhism
April 25, 2012:
Making Buddhist teachings on protecting nature more relevant
"Sometimes we in the faiths strive too hard to make our teachings and traditions relevant to the modern world. In the case of Buddhism I don't think this is necessary. The core teachings of Buddhism about illusion, reality and the nature of compassion are eternal. They are truths we need to hear today as much as in the time of the historical Buddha" - Martin Palmer at the 3rd World Buddhist Forum, Hong Kong