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ARC Home > Faiths and Ecology > Baha'i > Baha’i links :

Baha’i ecology in practice

The staff of the Baha’i Vocational Institute for Rural Women, shown posing in front of the women's dormitory at the Institute's headquarters in Indore, India

A major Baha’i ecological project is the landscaping of their world centre in Haifa. A series of gardens, terraces and fountains run from the foot to the crest of Mount Carmel. The project offers a reflection of the spiritual principles that must be applied to world problems if humanity is to create a truly peaceful world. For more information see the Baha’i on-line newsletter, ‘One Country’, ‘Reshaping God’s holy mountain’

Examples of Baha’i development projects are described on the Baha'i web-site bahai.org.

Background information on Baha’i ecology is available on the One Country on-line newsletter Environment Stories section.

For news of a new website dedicated to the UNESCO World Heritage Baha'i Gardens in Haifa and Akko, Israel, link to the Baha'i World News Service. To go to the Baha'i Gardens website, link here. And to learn more about the practicalities, link here.

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